Adolescents With Disabilities Face More Challenges Than Their Peers

Adolescents With Disabilities Face More Challenges Than Their Peers

Adolescents with disabilities face more challenges than their peers. The way these obstacles are resolved differ. Adolescents with disabilities have differing characteristics, needs and talents. Terminology is confusing and inconsistent. Difficulties doing developmentally appropriate task or activities are the most inclusive for disabilities. We can turn next to specifying underlying conditions that cause limitations. Special healthcare needs can be differentiated as chronic or subtle. Additional details on how to group these are as follows:

  • Boys are twice as likely to be reported as having activity limitation and 40 percent more than likely to have special healthcare.
  • Activity limitations are common among Hispanic and Asian children. However, special healthcare needs are more common among black, white, American Indian and pacific island children.
  • Children who live with families affected by poverty, have parents with lack of education. Single mothers are more likely to have mobility limitations. Salaries and household income is a vital factor for influencing outcomes for children with disabilities.
  • Nearly two thirds of adolescents with special healthcare needs have trouble with one or more of the following: anxiety, depression, acting out, bullying, fighting, making friends and arguing.

Adolescents with disabilities face many social problems that affect health and mind. Firstly, youth that gain special education services are from low income homes and experience bullying in school. They are less likely to participate in extramural activities, spend time with friends or enroll in tertiary education or training.

We at Action go one step ahead and encourage inclusion towards all diversities. Adolescents now stand to benefit from a society that values their presence.